Author Archives: Ellesilk

Shopping for high quality seamless bedding made with mulberry silk

silk duvetsAfter checking the momme weight, another element should be put forward is whether it is made with mulberry silk. As we all know, mulberry silk is indeed the silk bedding king of all.

Look for bedding made with mulberry silk (also called cultivated silk or bombyx silk). Avoid Habotai silk. It has a rougher matte finish and is made from wild silk which is of a lower quality than cultivated silk. Wild silk strands are not extremely long like cultivated silk strands are so they need to be spun together to create length creating a silk that is not as durable as the long single thread filaments harvested from cultivated silkworms.

So the next time you go shopping for silk bedding, don’t consider the silk sheets with seam is of lower quality, and it may not the best to reflect the class. Instead, the type of silk used, the momme weight should be the best indicators that will tell how high or how low the quality of the sheets are.

Silk term glossary V

Silk Velvet – pure silk velvet is very expensive (close to $1,000 a yard) and not wisilk duvetsdely available. Most silk velvet today is a blend of silk and rayon.

Satin – a confusing term at best. Technically “satin” refers to the weave of a fabric and not to the fabric itself. But satin is a term often use to define a smooth shiny fabric made of acetate, polyester and rayon. “Satin silk” is an ultra-luxurious silk.

If you are looking for the best quality silk bedding, choose products made with mulberry or cultivated silk and with a momme weight of at least 12. If you are looking for a more affordable option, Habotai and Charmeuse are popular.

Hope these terms will help you choose the silk that is right for you.

Silk term glossary IV

Duppoini Silk – it is fairly coarse to the touch but is strong and lustrous. Its coarseness does not make a good choice for silk sheets but it’s interesting texture makes it a popular choice for duvet covers and draperies.

Habotai Silk – also called china silk. It is a lower quality silk and although it is widely available in silk bedding it is not as durable as mulberry silk but is much more affordable.

Silk term glossary (II)

Wild Silk – silk harvested from silkworms that grow in the wild and eat a diet of whatever plant food is available to them. The natural color of wild silk ranges from a light ivory to a darker tan. It is less expensive than cultivated silk and not as durable. Although it is a good choice for many applications it is not the best choice for silk bedding because it is not as durable as cultivated silk.

Tussah Silk – a type of wild silk that typically comes from India or China with the India silk typically having more luster to it.

Thrown or Reeled Silk – a process done by hand to unwind the silk filaments from the cocoon. Most thrown or reeled silk is cultivated silk.

Silk terms glossary (I)

Many of you still puzzled about the silk sheets term, and as blow, we introduce them to you!

Momme Weight – this refers to the weight of a piece of silk fabric and in a standard measurement for silk. Momme weight calculates the weight of a piece of silk that is a standard 100 yards long and 45 inches wide. The weight of the piece of fabric that size is its momme weight. A piece of silk weighing 12 pounds has a momme weight of 12. When purchasing silk bedding look for a momme weight of 12 or higher.

Cultivated Silk – silk that is harvested from worms raised in captivity. Cultivated silk is the highest quality silk because great care is taken to ensure the silk filament threads harvested are not broken resulting in long and durable silk thread that is very strong – the strongest natural fiber in the world.

Mulberry Silk – the highest quality silk available. It comes from silkworms produced from the Bombyx mori moth. The silkworms are fed an exclusive diet of mulberry leaves. The resulting silk that is harvested is of a uniform light color, is rounder than wild silk, more uniform in size than wild silk, and finer than wild silk.

What is seamless silk bedding?

Many of the purchasers may have a passion for the seamless silk bedding not only for its perfect visual feeling but also considering it as a high quality one. However, is that true? And what, after all, is seamless silk bedding?

Like its name suggests seamless silk is bedding that does not have a center seam or two off center side seams. The standard width of pure silk is 45 inches which means silk bedding any bigger than twin size is going to have a seam in it. That seam is either directly down the center which is best for people who sleep on the side of their bed and not right in the middle of it; or two off center side seams which is better for people who do sleep in the middle of their bed. This prevents a person from having to lay on a seam or having a seam mar the smoothness of the silk comforter they are covered with.

And one thing needs to be mentioned that much of the seamless available on the market is not pure silk. It is a blend or a knit of silk and something else and is of a lesser quality, so do choose carefully.

Keep your silk sheets away from chemical detergent

silk duvetsWhile go for washing, there is still some detergent unexpected on your silk comforters. Although many people reach for Biz or Oxi-Clean when they have a stain on something, do not use either of those products on silk. They will damage them.

So will bleach – it will turn your silk an ugly yellow color.

If you do not want to take any chances with stain removal on your silk sheets, take them to your local cleaner and ask if they can remove the stain for you. Or contact the manufacturer of the sheets for tips and help.

If there there is no need to use any chemical detergent, try to stay away from them for both your silk duvets and your health.

Shopping for high quality seamless bedding checking the momme weight

Although seamless silk bedding does not represent the high quality, but there still some real good ones with seamless. How to pick them out! First, check the momme weight!

Look for a momme weight between 16 and 19, although you can have a momme weight (mm) as low as 12 and still be purchase a quality product. The higher the momme number the heavier that piece of fabric is and the more silk that was used in the construction of that piece of fabric. Any silk bedding sheets, whether it is made from mulberry silk or a more affordable wild silk, that has a momme weight of under 12 is not going to be durable and last a long time. You will save money initially but over the long term purchasing low quality sheets will cost you more than if you would have purchased a high quality set of sheets right away. This is because you will need to continue to replace those lower quality sheets at a far faster rate than high quality silk sheets which will last a long time if cared for properly and according to manufacturer’s instructions.

As it is said, momme weight is the common measurement for all silk!

Removing Other Stains From Your Silk Sheets

We have listed some of the common stains happen on your silk linen, and what if others? Deal with perspiration; you could use diluted ammonia (equal part of ammonia and water). Rinse well. And others like Oily or Greasy Stains try some liquid dishwashing soap letting it sit for few minutes. Rinse with water. There are still many for both of us to find out the best solution for it.

But not all silk is created alike. There are many different kinds which mean that a method that removes a stain on one type of silk may not work on another type of silk. Always test the method on an inconspicuous section of the sheets first, like on a corner of the fitted sheet that does not show when it is on the bed. All in all, keep your great silk duvets clean and there won’t be so much trouble for you!

Removing Lipstick and Makeup from your silk sheets

Cosmetics are another common stain happened, a short rest on your silk linen, and when you turn over in bed, your lipstick may easily kiss your silk pillowcase. How to wash them?

Try the laundry soap you use to regularly clean the sheets but in a little more concentrated form. If that does not work, try ammonia but be careful if the sheets are a dark color. Test in an inconspicuous place first and use as little as ammonia as possible. Start with 1 part ammonia to 3 parts water. If that doesn’t work increase the strength of the ammonia but never use anything stronger than 1 part ammonia to 1 part water.

After all, care for not “kiss” your silk bedding that would be the best solution.